5K run focuses on domestic violence The Park Church raises awareness May 21 May, 2016

The Charlotte Post
By Ashley Mahoney
May 18, 2016 5:18 pm

Domestic violence compromises mental, spiritual and physical potential.

Through a 5K run/walk on May 21 at 7 a.m. at The Park Expo & Conference Center (800 Briar Creek Road), The Park Church, Safe Alliance and the Jamie Kimble Foundation for Courage intend to raise awareness about domestic violence.

"The 5K is about reaching out beyond our church walls and seeing what some of the needs are in the city, and helping to meet those needs," said Roy Henderson, family life and wellness director at The Park Church. "One of the ways that Pastor [Bishop Claude] Alexander felt like a need needed to be met with family needs in relationship to domestic violence."

The race provides resources, such as education and counseling, to educate and protect individuals from harmful or potentially harmful situations.

"We do a domestic violence panel (6:30 p.m. on May 18 at The [..] read more


Women’s shelter named after founder April, 2016

The Courier-Tribune
By Kathi Keys kkeys@courier-tribune.com
April 19, 2016 - 7:29pm

ASHEBORO -- A women's shelter in Asheboro has served as a safe place, a haven, for battered women and children for nearly 37 years.
One of the founders of the Randolph County Family Crisis Center which operates the shelter was fondly remembered Tuesday. Maria Bliss, who died March 15, was honored during the center's Fourth Annual Leading Ladies Luncheon for which 275 women -- and a few men -- were invited to attend at Pinewood Country Club.

Judge Lillian Jordan reviewed the history of efforts to provide equal rights for women in Randolph County, noting that Bliss was involved in these in the 1970s. A result of the discussions and studies was the opening of the Shelter for Battered Women in the county in 1979. This shelter remains in its original location, continuing to provide services to women and [..] read more


Why aren’t we supporting women the way we need to? April, 2016

Charlotte Five
By Katie Toussaint
April 14, 2016

In my daily existence, I see continual shows of women being supported. I see Maureen O'Boyle's petition against her rapist earn more than 69,400 signatures. I see Corri Smith and Amy Herman grow their co-ed #InstabeerupCLT meetup each month -- with hundreds of people flowing into a brewery to network and make their idea to connect people in real life a reality.

I see my financial adviser friend help my event-planning friend with a budget, my doctor friend dole out medical advice to my nonprofit-based friend. I bump into a bunch of my yoga friends at [..] read more


Women for Courage Luncheon April, 2016

The Charlotte Observer
April 13, 2016

Dan Lebowitz, an expert on preventing domestic violence at Northeastern University, spoke at the Women for Courage Luncheon on Wednesday at the Charlotte Convention Center, and Ron Kimble and his wife Jan, parents of domestic violence victim Jamie Kimble, gave closing remarks. The Jamie Kimble Foundation for Courage was established by the Kimbles "so that her memory may live and so that others can live." The Foundation is committed to creating a future free of domestic violence.


See the original story here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article71591557.html [..] read more


After losing daughter to domestic violence, parents now hope to save others April, 2016

The Charlotte Observer
BY DAVID PERLMUTT
dperlmutt@charlotteobserver.com
APRIL 13, 2016 6:17 PM

Ron Kimble sported his favorite ladybug socks Wednesday.

Ladybugs, because his daughter Jamie "was a ladybug fanatic." And Wednesday would have been her 35th birthday had not a former abusive boyfriend fatally shot her in 2012 before he turned the gun on himself.

So Kimble, Charlotte's deputy city manager, and wife Jan decided that'd be an ideal day to hold the second annual fund-raising luncheon of their Jamie Kimble Foundation for Courage, the nonprofit the parents started to honor their only child and work on stopping domestic violence before it begins.

Nearly 1,000 friends, former colleagues and domestic violence awareness advocates filled a ballroom at the Charlotte Convention Center to hear pleas from the Kimbles and others to intervene when they suspect abuse.< [..] read more


Save the Date - Domestic Violence Prevention night with the Charlotte Checkers, March 12, 2016 January, 2016

Save the Date - Domestic Violence Prevention night with the Charlotte Checkers, March 12, 2016
For tickets: http://gocheckers.com/jkffc Use promo code: JKFFC [..] read more


Save the Date - Women For Courage Luncheon, April 13, 2016 November, 2015

Please save the date for next year's Women for Courage luncheon. It will be held on Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the Charlotte Convention Center.




[..] read more


March Against Domestic Violence in Uptown Charlotte November, 2015

The Charlotte Observer
By Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com
November 5, 2015
Charlotte assistant city manager Ron Kimble, far left, and other marchers take part in Thursday's march against domestic violence. Kimble has become an advocate for domestic violence awareness since losing his daughter Jamie in a case of domestic violence. The Domestic Violence Advocacy Council held a march on the Square in Uptown Charlotte on November 5, 2015 in response to a recent domestic violence-related homicide in Charlotte. Sarah Acker, 53, was killed at her northwest Charlotte home last week. Her boyfriend has been charged in the death.
Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/local/article43211577.html [..] read more


Charlotte official presses Congress to stop domestic violence October, 2015

The Charlotte Observer
BY FRANCO ORDOÑEZ
fordonez@mcclatchydc.com
OCTOBER 28, 2015 5:38 PM

One of the top executives in Charlotte, N.C., city government stood in front of new members of Congress on Wednesday to make a deeply personal plea to stop domestic violence.

Charlotte Deputy City Manager Ron Kimble, whose 31-year-old daughter was killed by her ex-boyfriend in 2012, told lawmakers that domestic violence knows no boundaries. It can strike anyone, he said, including a highly educated woman from a financially comfortable family.

"Her story is one that tells us that domestic violence can happen to anybody," Kimble told the members. "It doesn't choose its victims by race, by age, by socioeconomic status. It can choose anyone. Our daughter is proof."

State and local law enforcement reported [..] read more


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